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Medicine: Examination, Vaccination for Cats and More in Montreal

Prevention is as important for pets as it is for humans! Preventive care helps prevent diseases and allows your cat to live a longer, healthier, and happier life with you. At Cats Montreal, we offer cat owners care adapted to their pet’s condition, including vaccinations, blood tests, surgery, dentistry, hospitalization, therapeutic laser treatments for skin problems and pain, boarding and grooming. Make an appointment with us to ensure your cat’s health in Montreal!



General Examination

When conducting a complete physical examination, the veterinarian reviews the different aspects of preventive medicine: vaccination, parasite treatment, dental health, nutrition, behaviour, etc. The vet can also address your concerns during the examination.

A kitten will generally need 2 to 3 visits, one month apart, to immunize against diseases. This is also the time to do tests to make sure there is no leukemia or feline immunodeficiency (cat AIDS). For adult cats, it is important to have an annual exam. Cats over the age of 13 should be examined every 6 months and a blood test should be considered to detect diseases that may develop at this age as early as possible.

Treatments Offered:

  • Parasitology

  • Dermatology

  • Blood tests

  • Radiography

  • Urology

  • Cytology

  • Joint problems

  • And more

Vaccination

The vaccines given to cats provide effective protection against serious, highly contagious and sometimes fatal diseases for the most vulnerable felines, especially kittens. There are so many types of vaccines that most people are not sure exactly what is needed. When you consult a veterinarian, you’ll get information on what is best for your cat, and whether it is worthwhile to do a test to make sure there is no leukemia or other feline immunodeficiency before vaccinating.


The basic vaccine (PRC)
protects cats against three viruses, parvovirus (panleukopenia), herpesvirus (rhinotracheitis) and calicivirus. These viruses, which occur as easily as the flu in humans, can make a kitten very sick. That is why it is recommended your kitten be vaccinated around the age of 6 to 8 weeks, with boosters at intervals of 3 or 4 weeks until age 16 weeks. Visits should then occur annually and finally every 3 years.


The leukemia vaccine protects cats against an incurable viral disease that is transmitted through contact with another cat who has it or even one that had it in the past. Kittens are more at risk of developing the disease since their immune system is not yet fully developed. It is therefore important to get them vaccinated and make sure they are 16 weeks old at the time of the recall, a month later. Adult cats that go outside or come into contact with cats suffering from the disease must be revaccinated each year. Today, the test that detects leukemia and feline immunodeficiency viruses (cat AIDS) in our patients is a valuable asset in the fight against these diseases and should be considered for all cats rescued from the street or from places where they are in contact with a lot of other cats.


The highly recommended rabies vaccine is absolutely necessary for any outdoor cat. The reason is simple: rabies is a deadly disease and an infected animal can transmit it to other animals and humans. This vaccine can be given around the age of 16 weeks, as soon as the kitten has no more maternal antibodies.

Parasites

Parasites can be external, such as fleas, or internal, such as worms in the intestine. Some parasitic infections are considered zoonoses because they can be transmitted from cat to human. That's why guarding our little companions against parasites not only protects them, but also protects everyone around them. From the 1st to the 6th month, kittens must be treated, without exception. Adults are treated once a year if they do not go outside, but every month during the summer if they go outside. Among the most common parasites, we find:

  • Fleas

  • Ear mites

  • Cheyletiella (skin mite)

  • Ticks

  • Heartworm

  • Roundworm

  • Hookworm

  • Flatworm

Toxoplasmosis always worries expectant moms because it can seriously affect the health of the fetus. Cats are only contagious during the early weeks of the infection. After this, they develop antibodies against the parasite and can no longer transmit the disease. Many cats already have antibodies. To prevent any contagion when you are pregnant, do not let your cats go outside, do not feed them raw meat and wear gloves when changing the litter – or even better, ask someone to do it for you.

Diagnostic Tools

Lab
Our on-site lab allows us to conduct a wide range of tests for which we can often obtain results the same day, providing possible answers to our questions. The vet can therefore make a diagnosis and treat your pet without delay. The vet can also explain your pet’s condition to you, as well as provide you information on home care, and answer any questions you may have. In case your pet requires further tests, we deal with a specialized external lab as well.

Radiology
Our Clinic is equipped with an x-ray machine and a digital developer to display X-rays on the monitor, magnify them, examine a region in more detail, and improve contrasts to better evaluate structures. Our patients also benefit because the compression time is shorter. If applicable, we send X-rays to the radiologist for interpretation.

Ultrasound
When our patients need an ultrasound, two teams of specialists come to our Clinic and offer us their services: Animages for abdominal ultrasound and E-Vet Mobile Services for cardiac ultrasounds.

Hospitalization: To Promote Recovery

Hospitalization is never an easy time for the cat or for the cat owner. Even though we do everything we can to care for and protect our pet, the possibility remains that our feline companion can develop an illness or get hurt in a fight or unfortunate fall. At Cats Montreal, when we need to hospitalize a cat, we keep a close eye on their health and on their emotional comfort in order to improve their condition and promote fast recovery. If you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to call us.


All the Care They Need
Cats who are hospitalized at our Clinic are properly cared for by a team of competent veterinarians and animal health technicians. In addition, our rooms are equipped with instruments and devices that allow continuous monitoring for intensive care.

The Feline Traveler's Clinic

Are you leaving for a trip soon and taking your faithful companion along with you? At Cats Montreal, we can inject a microchip and the required vaccines one month before departure, depending on the country or countries you plan to visit. We can also issue the necessary documentation to help you make sure your pet meets the requirements of the destination country. The responsibility remains your own, however, and you will need to contact Agriculture Canada to obtain the documents to be signed by the veterinarian 10 days before departure, following an examination.

Information

Cats Montreal

1830 Sherbrooke St W

Montreal, Québec H3H 1E4


Phone: 514-939-2287


Service Area

Montreal

Business Hours

Monday to Thursday, 8:30AM to 7PM

Friday, 9AM to 5PM

Saturday, 9AM to 4PM

Sunday, 10AM to 2PM (Boutique only - the Clinic is closed)

In Case of Emergency

Centre Vétérinaire Rive-Sud
450-656-3660


Centre vétérinaire DMV
514-633-8888

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